Mom and Dad Can Still Travel – Seven Tips to Help Get Them Back on the Road Again

Are your parents reluctant to travel because they just don’t get around like they used to? Well they’re not alone. According to a 2012 US Census report roughly 30.6 million people have difficulty walking or climbing stairs, or use a wheelchair, cane, crutches or walker. Furthermore, nearly 40 percent of people over 65 have at least one disability, according to the US Census Bureau.

But that doesn’t mean travel is out of the question for these folks. In this day and age, with a little advance planning and consumer education, people are able to travel no matter what their disability. Additionally, many travel agencies now provide accessible travel products and services; and as Baby Boomers continue to age, more and more companies are jumping on the access bandwagon. With that in mind, here are some tips to help folks with mobility issues get back on the road — or in the air or on the sea — again.

  • Even if you can walk, reserve an airport wheelchair if you tire easily. Some airports are huge and you could easily put on several miles while in transit, and then arrive at your destination exhausted.
  • You are not required to remove your shoes at the airport security checkpoint if you are physically unable to do so. Just tell the Transportation Security Administration agent that you can’t, and they will hand wand you and swab your shoes for explosive residue.
  • If you need wheelchair accessible transportation from the airport to your hotel, choose a hotel that has a free airport shuttle. Under the Americans with Disabilities Act, if the hotel provides free transfers, they must also provide free accessible transfers, even if they have to contract out the service.
  • Cruises are a great accessible vacation choice, but new cruise ships are huge and it can be very tiring to walk from one end to the other. If fatigue is a factor, rent an electric scooter and have it delivered directly to your stateroom. Check with the cruise line for their approved vendors.
  • If you drive to the port, remember that parking is free at all Florida cruise ship piers for cruise passengers who have permanent accessibility modifications installed on their vehicles.
  • In Europe, remember the first floor is not at street level, so if you want a room at street level, ask for a room on the ground floor. Many small European hotels only have stairway access to the first floor.
  • Don’t forget to pack your accessible parking placard with you whenever you travel. It’s good everywhere in the US (except for New York City), Canada and Europe.

Finally, encourage your parents to do extensive pre-trip research, and expand their horizons. There really are a lot of accessible offerings out there and the internet is a great place to find updated access information.

Mastering Your Future, Or a Brief Introduction to Internet Marketing – Part I

If you're like most of the billions of people in the world, you think of "work" as the place you go five days a week, 8.5 hours a day. There's a commute, traffic, a boss you do not like, coworkers that are unhelpful, and a MOUNTAIN of stress. I'm sure you've thought "Work is lousy. The next day you get back up and go back to work.

Let's say that work becomes so much, and you decide that you're going to fire your boss, get a new job, and grow rich … the only problem is, you do not have any idea what job market you're headed for, or what kind of job you're going to try to get. Using your handy internet connection, fueled by coffee, you head to on over to Google, and start a late night of investigating jobs. By the end of the night, you've found THOUSANDS of work opportunities, but most of them are "Work from Home" opportunities. You're skeptical about the claims made on these pages about the fantastic incomes their members are seeing working only an hour a day.

That's fair. You're right to be skeptical. You'd be crazy to believe it all. But somewhere in you, this essential truth begins to arise: Some people really ARE making a living online. Not nearly everyone that tries, but some people are living out their dreams, working only when they want. When you realize that you were almost considering it, you probably figure that it's definitely time for bed. You can not sleep. You're too busy wondering if it really could work.

Here's a fantastic starting point:

If you've got a few of the programs that sounded good to you written down, great. If not, that's okay. Find a site offering reviews of programs from people that have paid for them. It's the best way to find out what is, or is not, a scam. Check out the programs you looked at, or find a few to be interested in. I used to recommend WorkAtHomeWatchdog, but it sees the site is not still running. I'm sure a quick search [http://www.google.com/webhp#hl=en&q=affiliate+marketing+site+reviews&aq=f&oq=&aqi=&fp=KxYPMM6r3XA] for "affiliate marketing site reviews" will get you something similar.

Find one thing to try. Go for something well-liked. Any program * can * work, some are just easier than others for the average person to succeed at. When you're looking at the programs, consider these things:

Are there startup costs or recurring fees? Will you need a website of your own? How much time does it require you to put in? Is there a trial period, a money-back guarantee, or both? How much are you willing to invest in your business to get started? How realistically can this program get you to your goal income? Does it let you use any special skills you may already have?

Pick a program that meets your criteria and is well rated, and plunge in. Soon, you could be leaving the boss behind.

Watch for I thought "Work From Home" mean I'm never griping about traffic again! (A Brief Introduction to Internet Marketing, Part II), coming soon.

** This article may be distributed and reprinted freely so long as it is reprinted in full, and all "About the Author" information is preserved with the article in its original state, including leaving all hyperlinks active. **

The Importance of Film Photography in a Digital Age

For the average family, a digital camera has become an essential item to record special moments throughout their lives together. Photography has drastically changed over the last few decades, and many of us who still remember the days of traditional film cameras that had to have pictures developed at the local pharmacy might be amazed by how quickly digital cameras took the stage.

And there’s a reason why: compared to traditional photography, digital photographs are easier to print out, sometimes off much higher resolution and photo quality, and can store more pictures than their traditional film camera ancestors could.

Still, there are many photographers, both amateur and professional, who haven’t abandoned traditional film photography or old-fashioned cameras. For them, the simplicity of the cameras and the photos, and the greater care it takes to develop the pictures, makes the process more therapeutic and artful. Particularly for photographers who still use their own darkrooms to develop their photos, traditional film cameras are a hobby that they would never give up for the relative ease of digital cameras.

Regardless of how much technology advances, there will always be people who still appreciate the simplicity of yesterday’s methods.

Using a traditional film camera, especially varieties that are many decades old, requires much more patience, diligence and care, especially when developing your own pictures. And for many photo enthusiasts who learned their craft with older equipment, the comfort of a familiar camera and the process of developing the film themselves can be therapeutic. Just as many people who own a dishwasher still wash dishes by hand because they find it relaxing or meditative, developing your own photos can be a very unique and calming experience.

And the fact that not just anyone can do it, and that it is a skill that must be developed with practice, makes it that much more rewarding.

Interestingly enough, there are still lots of families who go to amusement parks and pay to have their photos taken in an “old-fashioned” manner, with grainy black-and-white prints for novelty and fun. They even sometimes go so far as to dress in clothes from the nineteenth century to make it look more authentic. Ironically, though, most of these novelty old-fashioned photos are taken with modern digital cameras, then altered to appear authentically antiquated.

Understanding why some families find it fun to get their pictures taken in an old-fashioned manner can help you understand why some enthusiasts love collecting antique photo equipment and using the genuine, original camera to take their own old-fashioned pictures. Photography was one of the greatest innovations in human history, and being able to own a piece of that history is an important hobby for many antique collectors and photographers.

So the next time you think that digital cameras have made old-fashioned film photography obsolete and unnecessary, consider the many hobbyists and photographers who still take great pleasure in using and collecting traditional equipment. And if you’re an aspiring photographer yourself, you might want to try ditching the digital camera for a few weeks and have an old pro teach you a thing or two about film and darkrooms.

Language Issues – E-Commerce Website Solutions

It is suggested that the only way to do business successfully in other cultures is to adapt to those cultures. The phrase “think globally and act locally” is perfectly describes this approach. The main step that an online business usually takes to reach their potential customers in other countries is to provide local language versions of their Web site. This means you will need to translate e-commerce Web site into another regional dialect or language. According to a research, customers are far more likely to purchase products and services from the websites in their own languages. Only about 400 million of the world’s 6 billion people learned English as their native language.

Researchers also analyses that only fifty percent of the content available on the Internet is in English and more than half of current Internet users do not read English. International Data Corporation predicts that by 2010, more than 80 percent of Internet users will be outside the United States, and 65 percent of electronic commerce transactions will involve at least one party located outside the United States.

Even many languages require separate dialects and multiple translations. For instance, Spanish languages spoken in Mexico, Spain and Latin America have different dialects. So, it is important to check and translates the differences between the spellings and word meanings. Usually, many companies translate their website pages. When the web company grows larger, they become more selective in their translation efforts. Some e-commerce websites have thousands of webpages with much targeted content; the web businesses operating those sites can discover the cost of translating all pages to be expensive.

The decision whether to translate a specific webpage should be made by the corporate department responsible for each page’s content. Remember, that the home page of an e-commerce website should have versions in all supported dialects and languages. E-commerce website pages designed for product information, marketing and brand establishment should be given high priority of translation.

Different approaches can be appropriate for translating the different types of text that appear on an electronic commerce site. For key advertising messages, the touch of a human translator can be crucial to capture subtle meanings. For more routine transaction-processing tasks, automated software translation may be a satisfactory alternative. Many of the companies in this field are working to improve software and databases of previously translated material that can help human translators work more accurately and efficiently. The translation services and software manufacturers that work with electronic commerce sites do not generally use the term “translation” to describe what they do.